Where are we now ?

It was August 17th 2013, when I first arrived to the United States in hopes of gaining a better education and opportunity to have a place in the job market. My parents, teachers, friends even my house watchman believed that I will have a place in the American labor market. When you study economics you learn about labor markets and in those predictions 2017- 2018 would be a year where there would be a lot of opportunities for students who graduate with an undergraduate degree. Since the rise of Donald Trump whose new address is 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, sentiments have changed in college campuses. People are shouting to ‘Keep Hope’ ‘Not to give up’ ‘Fight for your rights’ but I honestly say I am very scared at this point of my life. If someone asked me before November 8th if after graduating I would secure a job with an Economics and Entrepreneurship degree, I would a smile and I would say yes because I believed in my capabilities as a student, however post American elections I don’t have that smile any more.

If someone was asked me before November 8th if after graduating I would secure a job with an Economics and Entrepreneurship degree, I would a smile and I would say yes because I believed in my capabilities as a student, however post American elections I don’t have that smile any more.

It’s not just me who is confused and but all the other international students who came at the hope of staying back for couple years, learn the American work ethic and go back to their home country and help it grow. Unlike the previous generations of students who arrived in 1990’s because the situation in India was not attractive or in other lacked opportunity, America used to be destination for everyone who aspired for a better living. With the millennial who arrived to the United States post 2010 don’t have long term ambitions to settle in their adopted country. I would lie if I said I don’t want to stay back in the United States, but I believe I need to imbibe certain professionalism, the structure on how business operate and then implement the American way of work ethics in an professional environment which India lacks. I believe the West has grown to a level of power where developing nations such as India and China aren’t given the same playing field. But that has to change because more than half of the population is in developing countries and human capital will be key in terms of innovation and in terms of capital expenditure. Chaitanya Krishna who is a student at University of Iowa, studying Computer science is very keen in working for Google. It is his dream company as he intends to specialize in Artificial Intelligence. After these elections he is confused on what should be his next steps even as a student who specialized in a STEM field he is finding it difficult to make up his mind after this election climate. However, at the end I believe the Indian software companies are to blame.

Thirteen outsourcing companies who are based out India take one third of all H1B visa. Seventy percent of the H1B visas went to workers from India which have displaced home grown jobs. Indian outsourcing companies have abused this program which has affected jobs to both Americans and incoming international students. The recent incident with Disney, where the American employees were substituted for Indian workers who were being paid a salary of a minimum of $60,000 compared to $85,000. When I discuss with my American peers, I develop a sense of openness but also the idea that there is a sense of resentment amongst people. While they are open to accept new cultures, the idea of their jobs being replaced by someone not part of their culture makes them inferior. However there are students like Vedant Agarwal who studied Business Management in University of Iowa, whose family owns one of India largest textile business believes in making his country toward a path of high economic development. He says ‘I want to work in India and make my business grow in South East Asia.’ His clients include big retailers such as GAP, Old Navy, Jack and Jones and if he wanted he could have secured a job in one of these companies. Instead he wants to go back, implement the knowledge he learned in college and expand his empire. In my situation, my family does not have its own business. My parents are career corporate employees. Therefore I have to break barriers and stand for myself and build a name for myself. I have to survive the competition amongst the labor market and give my hundred percent towards the company. With uncertainty for immigrants in next couple, I still believe in the land of opportunity and the American Dream which is still intact amongst the livelihoods in America and I want to be a part.

In my situation, my family does not have its own business. My parents are career corporate employees. Therefore I have to break barriers and stand for myself

and build a name for myself. I have to survive the competition amongst the labor market and give my hundred percent towards the company.


About the Author

Sohom Bhowmick 

Sohom Bhowmick is currently at Senior at University of Iowa. He is currently pursuing Economics and Management in his under graduate studies. He is currently working for TLUPS as the program Coordinator for Student Enrichment Program and sub editor for leading education research journal.


 

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